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Signs of progress against PTSD

A decade after the start of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, studies have shown that the incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among troops is surprisingly low. A Harvard researcher credits the numbers, in part, to efforts by the Army to prevent PTSD, and to ensure that those who develop the disorder receive the best treatment available. In an article in the May 18 issue of Science, Professor of Psychology Richard J. McNally says th Read more...

Repercussions of gender nonconformity

Children in the U.S. whose activity choices, interests, and pretend play before age 11 fall outside those typically expressed by their biological sex face increased risk of being physically, psychologically, and sexually abused, and of suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by early adulthood, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). It is the first study to use a population-based sample Read more...

Anti-Psychotic Drug Little Help to Vets With Chronic PTSD

Anti-Psychotic Drug Little Help to Vets With Chronic PTSD Published: August 2, 2011 New Haven, Conn. — An anti-psychotic drug commonly prescribed to patients with hard-to-treat post-traumatic stress disorder does not ease PTSD symptoms, according to a new study by the Department of Veterans Affairs and Yale School of Medicine. There are limited treatment options for tens of thousands of veterans suffering from PTSD who do not respond to ant Read more...

Can traumatic memories be erased?

Nature Could veterans of war, rape victims and other people who have seen horrific crimes someday have the traumatic memories that haunt them weakened in their brains? In a new study, UCLA life scientists report a discovery that may make the reduction of such memories a reality. “I think we will be able to alter memories someday to reduce the trauma from our brains,” said the study’s senior author, David Glanzman, a UCLA profess Read more...

Turning off stress

Nature Post-traumatic stress disorder can affect soldiers after combat or ordinary people who have undergone harrowing experiences. Of course, feelings of anxiety are normal and even desirable – they are part of what helps us survive in a world of real threats. But no less crucial is the return to normal – the slowing of the heartbeat and relaxation of tension – after the threat has passed. People who have a hard time “turning offR Read more...